4/01/2013 02:54:00 PM

Culinary Makeover: 10 Ways to Improve the NYC Dining Scene

NYC needs more options like Chicago's Fat Rice.
The New York City restaurant scene sets the agenda for much of the country, but it's also far from perfect, unless you actually enjoy paying $16 for a glass of white wine. There are lots of things to love about dining in The Big Apple, but from vino sticker shock to culinary dead zones, there are also areas that can be improved. Click through the slideshow below to see our suggestions for a food-world face-lift, and then sound off about what you think should be improved in the comments.

24 comments :

  1. It doesn't pay to have just a glass of wine. Better to get a bottle if there are just two persons.

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    1. The prices of wine & liquor are crazy.N.Y.C. needs more B
      B.Y.O restaurants that do NOT charge a corkage fee.

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  2. I am just not that thirsty folks! I get so irritated by hovering waiters who feel the need to refill my water glass after every sip.

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    1. It's called attentive service. If they didn't hover you'd be annoyed as well.

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    2. It's an inept attempt at being attentitive. Great reaturants that are known for service, like Per Se, have staff that know when to appear and when to restrain themselves. They refer to it as breaking the bubble of the diners - their needs to be a good reason to intrude on the meal.

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  3. Dining out is for the enjoyment of food and conversation....not music, not noise, not tv screens. If music and noise are your options, there are plenty to choose from. I avoid them easily.

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    1. i do not return to a restaurant where i can NOT hear the people at my table talking.

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  4. Someone should tell restauranteurs not to have
    their waiters start reciting specials or menus
    two minites after dinners sit down. Give us a break please. Bring the drink and let a person relax.You will never be rushed at Danny Meyer emporium.

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  5. The worst is sitting just 18 inches from the next table. Worse yet, are the restaurants in the Hudson Valley that cater to weekend NYers that design their establishments to be "NYesk". Why am I sitting 18 inches from the next table in Rhinebeck?????

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    1. agree.I do Not like sitting on top of the next table.You have no privacy.You can hear every word they are saying.

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    2. Good luck fighting that one. Closer tables --> more seating --> more $$.

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  6. Other hard to find cuisines, at least in Manhattan, are real Vietnamese and Burmese. There used to be a small chain of the latter in the city -- can't remember the name -- but I don't know of any replacements. Oh, yes, and Indonesian -- Rijsttafel is nowhere to be found.
    I agree 1,000% that noise levels in many venues are sure to cause deafness in their staff and to any regulars. Whatever happened to soft instrumental music?

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  7. Don't recite the specials and expect anyone to remember. Have a printed card at the table. The server won't have to go through the (long) list of specials and the diners will know the prices.

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    1. waiters should ALWAYS give the price of the special.People do not want to appear cheap so they do not ask.

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  8. When I arrive at a restaurant after a long day at work, I CANNOT STAND being told to wait until my "party is complete before being seated." Let me sit down, un-stress, have a drink or a glass of wine. They're coming, I promise!

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  9. Seriously, I am tired of small plates. What a ruse to offer less food and charge you more money.

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  10. #1 gripe: I wish they'd stop playing games with reservations.
    There's nothing quite so annoying as being told you can't have a table at 8:00, and being pushed to an earlier time than you really would like -- and then you watch as 8:00 rolls around and the place is still half-empty.

    #2 gripe: The trendy joint, populated with celebs and other rich and/or beautiful people -- with a back room to which the plebians can be banished and given perfunctory service.

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  11. I have left many restaurants because the music was too loud. I agree 100%.

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  12. Problem #1 - Music with a beat -- or any music once the restaurant is noisy.

    Problem #2 - We usually order a bottle of red wine with our dinner. In most restaurants, that bottle has been stored at room temperature, probably 75 degrees or more. When we ask the waiter to put it in an ice bucket for a few minutes, we often see an incredulous look -- these idiots want cool red wine? Yes, red wine should be served at around 55-65 degrees.

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  13. I no longer go to restaurants with a "No reservation" policy. And I don't accept the 5 PM or 10 PM slot when I know they just opened the reservation desk. My time is valuable, too. There are plenty of excellent restaurants that treat you as if they valued you.

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  14. I'm a martini (VERY DRY) drinker and since they cost 3 to 4 dollars more than gin on the rocks, I bring my own small sprayer of vermouth! Every dollar adds up.

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    1. Clever.

      I agree, especially with the recent trend towards "mixology", beverage pricing has gotten obscene.

      Might be time to start bringing a flask out again...

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