1/29/2013 12:30:00 PM

Italian Food Survey: Favorite Pastas; Is Home Cooking Better?

It's Italian Food Week, and some of the biggest debates over pasta, wine and celeb chefs are going to get settled right here. We surveyed 1,468 avid diners about their Italian eating habits and discovered that grandma's cooking may not always be the best. The results in the slide show will answer all your questions: which Boot-cuisine celeb is the most popular? Which pasta is the most comforting? How much is too much to spend on a dish at a restaurant? Click through to see the winners and losers of our first-ever Italian Food Survey, and sound off about the results in the comments. Also check out our list of the top Italian restaurants in 25 U.S. cities here.

12 comments :

  1. Red wine votes were split across regions and varietals, so Chianti/Sangiovese probably deserves the prize in the wine poll.

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    1. Agreed. Also, with Pinot Grigio at #1 and Moscato at $6, with Nebbiolo further down the list, I seriously question the sophistication of the people in the poll.

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  2. If Amarone doesn't show up on this list it makes me seriously question the sophistication of the people who took this survey.

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  3. AND...so sad to see the gnocchi was not on your list of pasta..it is one of my faves!

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  4. Please take note the ever annoying Queen of messipes Rachel Ray did not even place!!!

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  5. People who complain about Giada's pronunciation of Italian words are just ignorant. She was born and raised in Italy of Italian parents and speaks perfect native Italian. Americans should learn how to pronounce Italian food names correctly.

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    1. Not true: although born in Italy, she grew up in southern California, graduated high school and college in the US. She obviously speaks Italian, but speaks English without an accent -- which I think accounts for peoples annoyance, as if she purposely goes out of her way to highlight her articulation of Italian words, then goes back into unaccented English: kinda rubbing your nose in it.

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    2. Proper, classical, Italian language, as spoke by the well educated and upper classes of Italy, bears little spoken resemblance to the Italian used by the immigrants who came to the USA. And once here in the USA, the language was further brutalized and corrupted. Add to that, there are many regional dialects in Italy and Sicily.
      In any case, I would hazard a guess Giada's Italian is pretty darn good.

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  6. Having just spent a 6 month sabbatical in the Holy City of Bologna, I have to say that there is no competition in the US..Just save your money and go to Emilia Romagna

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  7. My father worked for a company Edra Haulage, they use to use their tractors to move Ronzzonni Macroni all accross the east coast. His Christmas bonus was a case of macroni or two. One he gave to his father my grandfather Rosiaro and we would eat the other. At times we ate some sort of pasta five times a week. My father use to grill us on the Ronzzonni Macori numbers. Thin speggitti #9, Orbo# 3 etc.... I can eat pasta still five times a week, but my son who is both Greek and Sicilian doesn't like it that much. Don't know how that happened?

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  8. Grandma's might not always be best? Who's grandmother is that? Maybe that grandma uses Ragu or some such thing. If you've had good Italian home cooking, you would never say such a thing. Maybe not all Italian grandmothers were good cooks. But mine were, as are my mother, father, aunts, uncles and cousins. We could out cook any "chef" we ever encountered. These chefs tend to way over estimate themselves and to grossly under estimate the home cook.

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