1/22/2013 05:58:00 PM

12 Must-Try Poutines (or Smothered Fries) Around LA

It's pretty authentic at Westwood's P'tit Soleil
To a Canadian, what passes as poutine around LA might be blasphemous, but we'll take the cheese-gravy-fries concoctions you find at some of our favorite restaurants and food trucks any day. There might not always be those squeaky little cheese curd nuggets nor a rich brown gravy, the fries may come in all shapes and sizes, and some may be more like amped-up American chili cheese fries than anything else, but who's fighting it? Not us. From beef tongue to banh mi poutine, here are 12 that top the list. Hangover not required.

8 comments :

  1. Shoot. I was planning to do a poutine round-up. There's obviously no point now. Well done, Lesley. I'd also recommend The Darkroom, which is where Jason Travi was consulting for awhile, and hear they have a solid poutine at Abigaile's in the South Bay, but haven't tried it yet. One of my favorite poutines was at Mezze, which involves fries, almond paste, foul, brisket, Syrian cheese and spicy Serrano peppers. RIP.

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    1. Sorry Josh! Thanks for the recs. And that sounds amazing from Mezze. I never had it, but I did like that restaurant and Wexler's food a LOT.

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  2. 26 Beach does french fries with brie & mozzarella covered with a mushroom demi-glace sauce! Outstanding!

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  3. Why does every article on "must-try" poutine in Los Angeles omit the most authentic purveyor in the Southland (Redondo Beach Cafe)? Is it because it's a blue collar joint where you can have a Canadian beer and a Montreal smoked meat sandwich while the hockey game is on, where the poutine classique (fries, Cheddar cheese curds and chicken-based brown sauce) comes on a respectable-sized plate and sets you back less than ten bucks? Poutine is a sloppy peasant food; ask a Québécois where to get the best poutine and they'll invariably point you to Chez Ashton, a popular fast food restaurant. It's a shame that Angelenos have to have their poutine elevated to lofty status with reduction of this and confit of that to where it's barely recognizable to a Hab. As a former Bostonian, I shudder to think of what will happen when some Southlander decides to try to one-up the Fluffernutter! By the way, my first sentence is a question... answers, anyone?

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    1. I have no excuse other than I simply forget every time. Thank you SO much for adding it to this to the list. The other pretty good traditional renditions (that I knew of) are on here though: Soleil, Gravy Train and now at Littlefork. Travi is very serious about getting it right after eating poutine all over Montreal. But I'm a sucker for the fancy versions, too.

      Thanks so much for the Redondo Beach Cafe add. Here's the Google+ page:
      https://plus.google.com/116308937969953546349/about

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    2. No excuses necessary, Lesley, I just can't understand why it's left off the poutine Top Tens excepting that perhaps not many people know of it. Even in Montréal you can get fancy with fois gras poutine at Martin Picard's Au Pied de Cochon, but the line goes out the door at La Banquise where you can get the low-brow stuff 24-hours a day. Thanks for the reply!

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  4. I second the comment about Redondo Beach Cafe. Any ex-pat or the Canuck-curious can get their dose of Montreal wonderfulness, minus the subzero winters.

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