10/23/2012 01:40:00 PM

Best Thing on Rex 1516’s Fall Menu: Scotch Duck Egg

What do you get when British cuisine meets Southern comfort food? In chef Regis Jansen’s hands, a very tasty appetizer that’s also quite a looker. We stopped in to try out some of his new fall menu at Rex 1516, and fell in love with the Scotch duck egg for it’s visual appeal as much as how much fun it is to eat. Instead of a puny chicken egg, a robust duck ovum is wrapped inside Tasso ham and then breaded and deep fried. Served with a creole mustard sauce and bits of fried sage, it’s more filling than it looks and is actually a deal at $7 for the plate.

Speaking of sage, we also sampled several of manager Heather Rodkey’s new fall cocktails, which are some of the best available in Philadelphia right now (trust us, we’ve tried quite a few). Standouts are the Sage Advice, in which Art in the Age’s newest spirit (Sage) stands in for gin in a Martinez-like concoction, and the Harvest, which matches Laird’s apple brandy with Philadelphia Distilling’s Bartram’s Bitters and a housemade apple-coriander shrub that takes three days to prepare.

Sample the sips as you explore the rest of the fall offerings, and don’t miss the stuffed beignet, a fluffy donut filled with savory chaurice sausage and shrimp bits with the best part - a jalapeño jelly - coming in spicy-sweet green cubes on the side. The South Street West restaurant has evolved quite a bit since opening early this year, and the atmosphere now lives up to its billing as “faded Southern mansion.” The marble bar is a perfect place to linger over a Chai Alexander dessert cocktail while you watch old movies from the 1940s and 50s on the TV, its flat screen the only giveaway that you haven’t traveled back in time yourself.


3 comments :

  1. Fail. It's just called a Scotch egg, never "Scotch duck egg". And the yolk should be runny.

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    Replies
    1. The reason it has "duck" in the title, Matt, is because the dish is often made with regular (chicken) eggs. This is a duck egg.

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  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_egg

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