8/07/2012 12:00:00 PM

8 Most Annoying Dining Moments in SF (and How to Avoid Them)

San Franciscans No. 1 peeve? Eat, don't tweet.
We love eating out in San Francisco, but as extraordinary as the food is, there are still some things about the local dining scene that are just downright annoying. You'll find many of these frustrating dining trends in metropolitan cities everywhere (like the two-plus hour waits outside tiny spots like Una Pizza Napoletana that don’t take reservations), but we wanted to know what your San Francisco-specific pet peeves were. From seemingly nonexistent reservations systems to the now-spurious Healthy San Francisco surcharge, to all those long food truck lines - click through the slideshow to see what SF dining moments really got your blood boiling. Haven't joined the conversation yet? Be sure to shout out your dining grievances in the comments!

4 comments :

  1. The noise...the God awful noise!!! So many restaurants make no effort whatsoever during the interior design of their establishment to take into consideration the effect (or lack thereof) of the wall treatments, window treatments, furniture, flooring, etc. on the amount of noise that is going to be reverberating throughout their establishment. I have walked in many eateries and then turned around and walked OUT because it was so incredibly noisy and resulted in actual discomfort.

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  2. Yeah - noise can be a show stopper, but mostly for the different kind of evening I'm looking for or the company I'm with, but It's fun to be in a lively place under the right circumstances... What gets me are the hipper than thou waiters you come across at some of these places!

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  3. Seriously, you're complaining about lines and an inability to get reservations at popular places?
    That's kind of... dumb. And obvious.

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  4. Most of these complaints are mildly annoying or petty, but the Healthy SF surcharge is downright nauseating. When you see celebrity chefs la-di-daing it up with their celebrity guests, or just the regular management-serf paradigm and they can't even cough up a few cents on each check for the well-being of their workers ... But having done some time in professional kitchens, it's completely in keeping with the way most restaurants treat their workers. (Actually, it's completely in keeping with the way most businesses treat their workers.) I understand that, especially in the first year, restaurants have a hard time making it, but perhaps SF could lighten up on the permitting and licensing processes, and allow them to put the money into staff benefits ... oh, hah, hah ...

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