5/16/2012 11:46:00 AM

10 Crazy Food Names Explained

Image Flickr/Caveman Chuck Coker
From regional U.S. specialties to international snacks, there's any number of bizarrely named foods that can make even the most sophisticated gourmand chuckle. But do these oddly dubbed foods have a backstory explaining their silly-sounding nomenclature? Natch. Check out our slideshow of 10 of the weirdest food names we could find. What did we miss? Let us know in the comments.

15 comments :

  1. Paris-Brest is a race on its own, not part of the Tour de France

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  2. The label of Pocari Sweat answers why it's named as such - the sweat part comes from the fact that you are replacing the ions and nutrients that you would normally sweat out, thus it's like drinking your own sweat. Seriously? Do better research!

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  3. This is not a condition to be made sport of.

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  4. What you didn't mention is that 'pasty' (food) is pronounced to rhyme with 'nasty', but 'pasty' (item of, ahem, clothing) rhymes with 'hasty'. They only look the same.

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    1. I totally concur, being fom the Great State of Michigan. Ya gotta know how to say it, ya troll.

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  5. Awesome roundup! I actually learned some things and now, I know that the Brits are just a bunch of wack-jobs.

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  6. Ugli fruit is named because of its wrinkled, lumpy, and unevenly-colored skin. For those who might not have eaten one before, don't judge it by its cover -- ugli fruit is like an extra tasty grapefruit.

    Try ugli fruit cut into supremes (skinless wedges) or juiced with some olive oil and a little shaved parmigiano on top of shaved fennel root. Either just leave the ingredients simple, or mix the ugli juice with the olive oil, a little dijon mustard, and an herb or two to make a tasty vinaigrette. They're cheap now too, since spring is their season!

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  7. Headcheese in a bahn mi, oh yes!

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    1. I couldnt view the pix but remembering a funny time at a deli where I was helping out one day and asked a gentleman what he was going to do with the head cheese- he replied oh my wife eats the (expletive), and my dog seems to like it too

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  8. what happened to Zagat? it used to be good

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  9. Pupu actually means seashell in Hawaiian. Appetizers are like little shells.

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    1. And in my West Hollywood, mid '70s world, a Pupu Platter wouldn't be complete without Rumaki...a glorious little shell consisting of a water chestnut and a piece of chicken liver wrapped with bacon. OMG! Broiled to Perfection, it became the star of every cocktail party it was invited to! Even those guests who gagged on the WORD liver, couldn't eat just one. By the way, this flavor bomb wasn't indigenous to W.H. I brought it with me from my early 70s home...Honolulu.

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  10. Oh how we love those parochial folk at Zagat USA - you should really try getting out more and you'll find out that the American way isn't always the only way...

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  11. My now-defunct favorite crazy food name was Japanese: Calpice, a milky white drink. When I offered it to most people, there was always a double-take; "You want some Calpice?" And in my hand is a cup of white liquid. You can imagine. As it started selling more internationally, they changed the name to Calpico.

    On a side note, Pocari Sweat does have a salty-oily texture that reminds me of real sweat. I used to say, "Who is Pocari and why are we drinking his sweat?"

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  12. How about including Haggis? And neaps and tatties?

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